“The Hunger Games: Catching Fire” by Suzanne Collins | Book Review

It was actually a last minute decision for this to be the book that I take a look at. This review was also delayed due to poor health, for which I apologise.

Continue reading ““The Hunger Games: Catching Fire” by Suzanne Collins | Book Review”

Advertisements

“Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone” by J.K. Rowling | The Sunday Review

A little while ago, I decided to revisit one of the book series that defined my, uh, everything: The Harry Potter series, by J.K. Rowling. In seven blog posts, I will look at the seven books in turn, and then perhaps take a look at some of the properties that accompany those seven books.

So, let’s get started with the first book in the series, shall we?

Continue reading ““Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone” by J.K. Rowling | The Sunday Review”

“Eragon” (The Inheritance Cycle, #1) by Christopher Paolini Book Review | The Sunday Review

After some downtime, the Sunday Review is back with a vengeance! A … fairly gentle vengeance, but a vengeance. Today, we’ll be taking a look at something which is fairly nostalgic for me, and which holds a lot of weight as something to endlessly rant about. Yes, we’ll be looking at that classic in the realm of hatedom: Christopher Paolini’s Eragon.

It’s got swords. It’s got sorcery. It’s got elves and orc—um, I mean Urgals. This book, while widely loved by teenage boys and me before I became unbearably sarcastic, has become one of the internet’s biggest pet peeves. So what better book to welcome back the Sunday Review? Let’s take a look at this much-hated classic, and see if it deserves its reputation!

Continue reading ““Eragon” (The Inheritance Cycle, #1) by Christopher Paolini Book Review | The Sunday Review”

The Sunday Review | “The Hunger Games” (The Hunger Games, #1) by Suzanne Collins

The_Hunger_GamesTitle: The Hunger Games
Series: The Hunger Games, #1
Author: Suzanne Collins
Published: Scholastic, 2008
Rating: ★★★

buy1

Goodreads Synopsis

Winning will make you famous.
Losing means certain death.

The nation of Panem, formed from a post-apocalyptic North America, is a country that consists of a wealthy Capitol region surrounded by 12 poorer districts. Early in its history, a rebellion led by a 13th district against the Capitol resulted in its destruction and the creation of an annual televised event known as the Hunger Games. In punishment, and as a reminder of the power and grace of the Capitol, each district must yield one boy and one girl between the ages of 12 and 18 through a lottery system to participate in the games. The ‘tributes’ are chosen during the annual Reaping and are forced to fight to the death, leaving only one survivor to claim victory.

When 16-year-old Katniss’s young sister, Prim, is selected as District 12’s female representative, Katniss volunteers to take her place. She and her male counterpart Peeta, are pitted against bigger, stronger representatives, some of whom have trained for this their whole lives. , she sees it as a death sentence. But Katniss has been close to death before. For her, survival is second nature.

Review

Merry Christmas! Or not. I don’t know when you’re reading this. But it’s Christmas for me, so … Anyway! In this Sunday Review, we’re going to be taking a look at The Hunger Games. This is the book that you guys voted for! And if you want to participate in the votes, by the way, then make sure you’re following my Twitter.

It’s funny, because I was actually going to delay posting this review. But today I got angry. Not at this book. But at something that happened to me. I got really, really angry. And I’ve calmed down a bit, but while I was angry I thought fuck. I have to review something. And, really, I have to review what you guys voted for.

Continue reading “The Sunday Review | “The Hunger Games” (The Hunger Games, #1) by Suzanne Collins”

The Sunday Review | “The Legend of the Blue Eyes” (Blue Eyes Trilogy, #1) by B. Kristen McMichael

blueeyes

Title: The Legend of the Blue Eyes
Series: Blue Eyes Trilogy, #1
Author: B. Kristen McMichael
Published: Lexia Press, March 2013
Genre: Young Adult, Paranormal
Rating: ★ 

Amazon | Goodreads

Goodreads Synopsis

Arianna Grace liked her boring, Midwestern, teenage life where she ignored the many unanswered questions of her childhood. Why were her parents dead? Why did she not have family? Where was she raised until she was five? When someone offers to explain it all, Arianna thinks she’s just getting answers. Instead, she is thrown into a world of night humans who drink blood.

On Arianna’s sixteenth birthday, her world is thrown upside down when she changes into a vampire. Night humans, or demons, as some call them, live in normal society. Learning all of the new rules of a world she didn’t know existed might be hard enough, but it’s further complicated by two former-friends that now want to help her take her role as the successor to her grandfather.

There is a war going on between the night humans. Sides have been taken and lines are not crossed. Four main clans of night humans are struggling for control of the night. Divided into two sides, clans Baku and Tengu have been at war for centuries with the clans Dearg-dul and Lycan. That is, until Arianna Grace finds out the truth; she’s the bridge of peace between the two sides. But not everyone wants peace. With the night humans divided, Arianna is now a pawn in the war between them. She must choose a side—her mother’s family or her father’s—and for once in her life, decide her own fate.

You know, if you took the boredom out of the equation, this book would be the literary equivalent of thrush.

Continue reading “The Sunday Review | “The Legend of the Blue Eyes” (Blue Eyes Trilogy, #1) by B. Kristen McMichael”